Hawaii Vacation Home
       
     
 For the Hana project, we returned to our original forming system - one set of plywood and wooden walers, held together with pipe clamps. We mixed on the ground with the tractor bucket and shoveled into the forms. It’s been a long time since we ground mixed and shoveled. It’s been a long time since we built one small panel at a time, but under the circumstances, where speed and efficiency were not the drivers (no general contractor holding us to a schedule), and where the labor rates weren’t a factor (all volunteer), the old style worked well.   Image © Art Gray
       
     
 The key to comfort in the tropics is ventilation - lots of it. We used supporting earth walls as sparingly as possible. Big panels of sliding glass open to mimic the original concept of a Hawaiian hale. Open gable ends and cupolas keep the air flowing through the pavilions. Breezeways accelerate air movement.  The property is currently for sale.    Image © Art Gray
       
     
 Hawaiian earth, eroding as it has from geologically young igneous rock, lacks the weathered clays that usually bind rammed earth together. Basaltic grains are porous and thirsty, making it difficult to control optimum moisture and tricky to build with.   Image © Art Gray
       
     
 The coarse walls that result from the high percentage of basalt gravel in the mix, and leave a preponderance of small voids in the surface. In concrete, this would be called “honeycomb”. We fill the voids with a slurry of tile grout to give the finished wall the look of travertine.   Image © Art Gray
       
     
 View through the sliding dining room wall glass panels into the breezeway. Tradewinds pick up speed as the funnel through the breezeway, pulling heat from the living spaces.   Image © Art Gray
       
     
Hawaii Vacation Home
       
     
Hawaii Vacation Home

The bungalows in Hana, Maui are an Easton/Wright family affair. Built over a span of several years, the three pavilions marry the vernacular island style with new concepts. Traditionally, the broad roofs built of poles and thatch were supported on rock pilasters or wooden posts. For our version, we supported the galvanized metal roofs on wall panels of rammed earth and a hand-thrown version of pise. The property is currently for sale.

Image © Art Gray

 For the Hana project, we returned to our original forming system - one set of plywood and wooden walers, held together with pipe clamps. We mixed on the ground with the tractor bucket and shoveled into the forms. It’s been a long time since we ground mixed and shoveled. It’s been a long time since we built one small panel at a time, but under the circumstances, where speed and efficiency were not the drivers (no general contractor holding us to a schedule), and where the labor rates weren’t a factor (all volunteer), the old style worked well.   Image © Art Gray
       
     

For the Hana project, we returned to our original forming system - one set of plywood and wooden walers, held together with pipe clamps. We mixed on the ground with the tractor bucket and shoveled into the forms. It’s been a long time since we ground mixed and shoveled. It’s been a long time since we built one small panel at a time, but under the circumstances, where speed and efficiency were not the drivers (no general contractor holding us to a schedule), and where the labor rates weren’t a factor (all volunteer), the old style worked well.

Image © Art Gray

 The key to comfort in the tropics is ventilation - lots of it. We used supporting earth walls as sparingly as possible. Big panels of sliding glass open to mimic the original concept of a Hawaiian hale. Open gable ends and cupolas keep the air flowing through the pavilions. Breezeways accelerate air movement.  The property is currently for sale.    Image © Art Gray
       
     

The key to comfort in the tropics is ventilation - lots of it. We used supporting earth walls as sparingly as possible. Big panels of sliding glass open to mimic the original concept of a Hawaiian hale. Open gable ends and cupolas keep the air flowing through the pavilions. Breezeways accelerate air movement. The property is currently for sale.

Image © Art Gray

 Hawaiian earth, eroding as it has from geologically young igneous rock, lacks the weathered clays that usually bind rammed earth together. Basaltic grains are porous and thirsty, making it difficult to control optimum moisture and tricky to build with.   Image © Art Gray
       
     

Hawaiian earth, eroding as it has from geologically young igneous rock, lacks the weathered clays that usually bind rammed earth together. Basaltic grains are porous and thirsty, making it difficult to control optimum moisture and tricky to build with.

Image © Art Gray

 The coarse walls that result from the high percentage of basalt gravel in the mix, and leave a preponderance of small voids in the surface. In concrete, this would be called “honeycomb”. We fill the voids with a slurry of tile grout to give the finished wall the look of travertine.   Image © Art Gray
       
     

The coarse walls that result from the high percentage of basalt gravel in the mix, and leave a preponderance of small voids in the surface. In concrete, this would be called “honeycomb”. We fill the voids with a slurry of tile grout to give the finished wall the look of travertine.

Image © Art Gray

 View through the sliding dining room wall glass panels into the breezeway. Tradewinds pick up speed as the funnel through the breezeway, pulling heat from the living spaces.   Image © Art Gray
       
     

View through the sliding dining room wall glass panels into the breezeway. Tradewinds pick up speed as the funnel through the breezeway, pulling heat from the living spaces.

Image © Art Gray